Letters to the Editor — May 5, 2021

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The Issue: Schools Chancellor Meisha Ross-Porter’s call to eliminate admissions tests at elite schools.

Seth Barron was exactly right — the test to enter elite high schools is not the culprit (“Wrong Culprit,” PostOpinion, May 1).

The culprit is parents who do not make sure their children work hard in school. The culprit is the teachers unions who only care about teachers.

As China produces a well-educated population, the United States is falling behind, no matter how much money is thrown at the problem.

School choice would make a big difference by making schools competitive. You can do that with an increased supply of charter schools.

Some children are just not capable of achieving at elite high schools. However, their outcome, and America’s, are brighter with school choice. The unions must be dealt with if this country is to compete in the 21st century and beyond.

Glen Benjamin

Suffern

Is it OK for officials to limit the number of Asians in specialized high schools? Isn’t that discrimination against Asians?

The excuse is we need higher numbers of other minorities in these schools, and it’s unfair that Asians take up a large portion of the seats.

Are they saying that minorities can’t compete on an equal playing field or that Asians are smarter than any other race? I find that degrading and insulting. Did anyone consider their work ethic?

Al D’Angelo

The Bronx

In New York City, equity ensures that no one moves up the ladder.

Of course, Schools Chancellor Meisha Ross-Porter blames the admissions test, seeing it as discriminatory and racist, since Asian students seem to do well on them.

Let’s scrap the test and ignore the fact that these elite schools require a high standard of subject comprehension and personal responsibility for academic success.

Ross-Porter and her colleagues have made it their career goals to set the bar so low that everyone is essentially hanging on for dear life.

Equal opportunity does not equate to equal outcomes. There is nothing equitable about universally low standards and expectations. Stop making excuses and blaming a test for obvious failures of the educational system at large.

Theresa O’Brien

Melville

The racial and ethnic percentages of students accepted to New York City’s elite schools show that Asian students are more prepared for school than other groups.

Many blame Asian students’ success on the unfairness of the test. This just isn’t true. Others blame the poor performance by other ethnic groups on the poor education received in the city’s failing elementary schools. This isn’t true, either.

It seems as if no one has the courage to actually identify the biggest issue of all — there are some parents and families that put a very strong, early emphasis on education and learning within the home.

Specifically, many parents will promote reading, studying, behavior, discipline, good learning habits and a good learning environment early on. The children who are given better tools early on will have a much better chance to thrive and succeed.

Jack Ridolph

The Villages, Fla.

The chancellor seems to be the one who advocates white supremacy, because she wants to lower standards, as if students of color are incapable of passing. These children are quite capable, but are stuck in public schools that consistently leave them ill-prepared.

School choice has long been advocated as a lifeline by Republicans. Now even 70 percent of New York Democrats support more charter schools.

Hey, state Legislature: How about pulling off a bipartisan victory for your constituents that is guaranteed to help inner-city kids?

If you don’t act on this issue, you must be racists who want to keep people of color down.

Deirdre Harvey

Valley Stream

Eliminating testing for acceptance to educational programs makes as much sense as eliminating tryouts for basketball teams.

Charles Boxenbaum

Brooklyn

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